'Reverse' mylar experiment: Lining outside for longevity

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Banff Martin
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'Reverse' mylar experiment: Lining outside for longevity

Post by Banff Martin » Thu Feb 14, 2013 1:15 pm

First, I'm starting to want to do a build on the company campus again. Second, as we're partly an arts facility I don't think it would be too unusual to have a mutant igloo here. =) Third, winter is drawing to a close and why not see how long an igloo can be made to last!

The question is ultimately how much longer an igloo would last with the outside covered with Mylar. The installation method would be similar as my 9' experiment, though in this case the mylar would rest against the snow walls, except for the anchor points. As there would be some air between the wall & Mylar, I would think there wouldn't be too much conduction of heat..? The Mylar would be tugged snugly between the anchor points, which may help reducing how much surface area would be touched by the Mylar.

This would be a 9 or 11' model, preferably the latter. The pad wouldn't be as massive as my last. With the build site as is, a proper pad would result in the door facing the sun. Not my first pick, but I want to ensure anyone interested could easily enter, as well as not cut too high into the wall to provision for this.

With the Mylar on the outside, other installation methods may be done...like pressing lengths of rope into the walls vertically, attaching a manner of adhesive, then pressing the Mylar onto that.

Thoughts? :D
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Igloo Ed
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Re: 'Reverse' mylar experiment: Lining outside for longevity

Post by Igloo Ed » Fri Feb 15, 2013 7:35 pm

What? You got stock in a mylar place?! Heh.
Do consider the rain, if the edge of anything drips on the wall, it'll melt a hole through the igloo.
Wind and mylar are not a good combination and you are talking a prolonged time.
It might also keep out the freezing temperatures through the night that help the igloo last longer.
The ten and eleven footers are not near as stable as the smaller igloos.
You mentioned not have as much of a base. A thin layer of snow for a floor inside will stop the heat of the ground from warming the igloo from the inside and sun shining in the door will really warm up the inside.

Banff Martin
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Re: 'Reverse' mylar experiment: Lining outside for longevity

Post by Banff Martin » Thu Feb 21, 2013 8:57 am

Hmmm...

I'll be sure to secure the Mylar well to the igloo wall then, and use plenty of clear packing tape to make it waterproof. If I do this well so the wind can't grab the material, it might work out.

To prevent rain from being an issue I'll have to get creative around the air hole, though in this case as the entrance will be higher than the floor, do I actually need one?

I don't see a way around the night time re-freezing issue...we'll have to just see how that goes.

I'll keep it to a 9' model for this experiment then. As it will be a staff event this may be for the best anyway. I plan to have the pad built the night or two before the event, and then the build is to run 9-5 on March 9th. I'll prep the materials for the Mylar layer beforehand as well.

I'll make sure the pad is at least a foot deep then. 2' would be great, but we'll see how the evenings leading up to the event go...I find building the pad to be the hardest work!

Thanks!
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Igloo Ed
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Re: 'Reverse' mylar experiment: Lining outside for longevity

Post by Igloo Ed » Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:42 pm

I don't think rain getting in would be a problem if the vent is on top of the igloo.
The vent might help if it was opened in the night so the igloo can freeze and then plugged through the day to save the cold. I've seen it though were the sun shines in the door and it is best to leave the vent open to let the heat out.
The pad is a lot of work at times. If you have a foot of snow, it can be put on the pad by standing with your back to the igloo and the shovel being used like a canoe paddle to throw the snow up on the pad behind you.
You need to film the tape and mylar part of the project....! LOL.

Banff Martin
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Re: 'Reverse' mylar experiment: Lining outside for longevity

Post by Banff Martin » Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:49 pm

As I expect to have to cut into the igloo wall for a large enough entrance that most people can enter through easily, I presume I can cancel the air hole entirely?

Though I know it isn't going to be ideal, I plan to have the door face away from the sun on this build. This means the igloo will be on level ground without a slope 'advantage' for the door.

Sounds more like a technique to throw snow on people behind you and claim it's part of the process! =) I'm fortunate to be able to borrow a large scoop-bucket shovel that will make snow collection/moving straight forward. It's still a sweaty matter to build a 2' pad though...it's a lot of mass to move.

I'll see what we can do for filming...we have the technology!
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Igloo Ed
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Re: 'Reverse' mylar experiment: Lining outside for longevity

Post by Igloo Ed » Thu Feb 28, 2013 12:52 pm

The vent is pretty irrelevant if the door is tall. People like crawling on an old piece of carpet...
I try to build the igloos with the door facing away from the sun but ,more than not, I let the terrain dictate the door location. The door sagging in the sun shows on igloos I come back to visit.
Heh, the paddling/shoveling technique does work well for throwing snow on those in the way... You have your back to them and as long as they don't start throwing rocks at ya...
Seriously though, one can control the paddling technique well enough to just scoop the snow up on the ledge and not throw it. It's the strongest muscles one has and I use it as much as I can. The main thing I try to avoid is lifting the snow with the shovel. I do everything I can to avoid lifting snow. I push big piles, sweep shallow snow, rake hard snow and paddle the deep stuff. The paddling is the closest I come to lifting the snow.
But then, lifting is best, if the snow is wet and sets up hard after moving it.
A picture at least would be interesting. A follow up too on how long it lasts would be appreciated too.
I think you're "doing it right".

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